Saturday, 1 July 2017

Interview with Richard Lake

1. Hello and welcome from us at BlitterWolf. For our readers could you tell us your name, country and occupation please?
A. Hello there, my name is Richard Lake, I am from the picturesque English county of Lincolnshire. My career is in the online world, I am a Web Developer by trade, working mostly on WordPress sites and projects right now - my core languages are CSS/SASS, PHP, XML, JavaScript and of course HTML. I am also a DJ, a lifestyle which has seen me travelling the breadth of Northern England over the last 16 years. Ten years ago (phew where does the time go!) I was basking in the Greek sunshine on the isle of Corfu in the lively resort of Kavos for the Summer season. Last year I turned 40, and so my lifestyle has changed once again - now I am into cycling and keeping fit, generally looking after myself - my Red Bull years are behind me!
Richard Lake
2. When was your first experience with the Amiga and what were your thoughts?
A. I was 11 years old when my Dad first bought an Amiga, I was lucky enough that he often let me play on it for a few hours after school, on weekends and during school holidays. Back in the day I was heavily into gaming, but I did also dabble in BASIC on other platforms and then programming on the Amiga using Francois Lionet's AMOS language.
Prior to the Commodore Amiga, looking back I find that me and my Dad shared everything when it came to computers and computer games, the family computer pre-Amiga was a C64 and before that a ZX Spectrum 48k, even further back we had an Intellvision console thingy-me-jig in the house.
When the Amiga arrived it was such a massive leap forward from the 8-bit era, apart from the odd cheap ports, anything before the arrival of the Amiga paled in comparison.

3. What Amiga systems do you currently own?

A. Nowadays I purely own an AmigaOne 500 from Acube Systems. Originally bought in 2010/2011, wow cannot believe how time flies.

4. How many Amiga systems have you owned in your lifetime?
A. Well that's an easy one, an Amiga 500, CDTV, CD32 and the king of them all the mighty A1200.  The A1200 got me through my college years, in a world of monochrome Macs and the Amiga rip-off that was Microsoft Windows '95, I continued to use it for study and play up until 1998 when it ceased to work no more. In the later years of its life it was re-homed in a Tower, fitted with a Cybergraphics card of some description and a PowerPC accelerator card with an enormous amount of FAST RAM. It had numerous peripherals such as a CD-ROM drive, a Hard Disk and a Squirrel storage device.

5. Do you prefer using Classic or New Gen hardware?
A. Nowadays, I don't have the time or patience to fiddle with Classic machines and so much prefer more modern solutions - having said that I do not like emulation; if I do ever get into the Classics I'd rather than the real deal.

6. What Amiga Operating System between 1.x and 4.x do/did you like to use most?
A. Back in the early 90s I extensively used all versions from 1.x to 3.x.  Its hard to say which I liked the most as it was the software that I enjoyed the most. However, if we talk about Workbench, I would say Workbench 3.0 was light years ahead of anything else on the market at the time.

7. Have you ever been a member of an Amiga group and if so when and where?
A. Regrettably I have never been a member of an Amiga group, however having said that I have in the past few years been to my local get together, the Lincolnshire Amiga Group 3 times.

8. Did you have your most favourite played games on Amiga and what were/are they?
A. In the early 90s, me and my Dad would spent hours and days together playing games, my Dad got me into DnD and RPG games, Dungeon Master, Might and Magic; and all the SSI games featured heavily in our game playing from 1988 to around 1992.  I would have to say my absolutely favourite what nowadays we refer to as a Dungeon-crawler would have to be Tony Crowther's epic Captive. Such a ground-breaking game in many ways, I was also a big fan of strategy games such as The Settlers, Sim City and Mega-lo-Mania.
Point-and-click adventure games also featured heavily in my informative years - I have to admit completing The Secret of Monkey Island was such an overwhelming and joyous experience! So many positive memories from the Amiga years.

9. Best Amiga system of all time for you?
A. Well my first encounter with Amiga was the A500 so for me that was the best Amiga for me.

10. Best Amiga game of all time for you?
A. Too hard to call had so many memorable favourites. If I were to choose a publisher though, I'd say that it would have to be Psygnosis, Sensible Software or Core Design.

11. What are your thoughts about what happened to Commodore - Amiga?
A. When Commodore ended so did my love for computers for a good wedge of time, I hated MS Windows and got through my college years as much as possible by extending the life of my Amiga 1200 and buying add-ons. I must have endured 6 years were computers just didn't interest me anymore. Then in the Summer 2001 on a trip around my local PC World, my eyes opened wide as eyed up this iBook G4.  At the time I knew nothing about MacOS - all I knew is that it wasn't Windows. Finder shares so many similarities with Workbench; it almost seems like the most logical choice for most Amiga users.

12. How do you feel towards AmigaOS4 and reincarnations like AmigaOne?
A. Well I've come to learn that it is nothing more than hobbyist system, there is no-one willing to throw serious amounts of money at it; and because of my learnings my feelings and attitude toward AmigaOS4 remain positive.

13. What do you make of the Amiga spin offs like MorphOS or AROS?
A. I don't really have an opinion about either, I've never used MorphOS, as for AROS - from the little I have used all I can say is that it is it way behind despite being open source.

14. What do you think about accelerators like the Vampire?
A. I think its incredible that even today there are individuals out there who are dedicated in furthering advancements of Classic Amiga systems. Although I do not currently own any Classic systems I do read about such innovations and it is indeed exciting to see. For anyone wanting to buy to one I am sure they will not be disappointed - I think when and if they release a model for the A1200 it will be an instant success.

15. What do you see as the future for Amiga or Amiga like OS?
A. Unfortunately unless anything changes anytime soon its decline into absolute obscurity will continue unabated. Software development is glacial and the cost of new hardware is prohibitive. Someone really needs to bring an entry-level, highly affordable Amiga/AmigaOS to market. Aside from hardware though we (AmigaOS users) desperately need new software and existing software bring up to date. A powerful browser that supports all the current standards and a comprehensive office productivity suite are central to any such conceivable success moving forward.
I wish I could be more positive, but there just doesn't seem to be enough of an cash-injection into Amiga. I would love to be proved wrong! In the meantime I am sure next generation Amiga users and Classic hardware owners will continue to enjoy many more years of running AmigaOS whether it be games or for productivity software.


16. I understand you are quite an active supporter of AmigaOS, can you please tell our readers more about this?
A. Yes of course. I am fairly active on social media; especially Facebook. You can often catch me posting on a couple of prominent Facebook pages; facebook.com/Amigafans (the big one: 126,000 likes) and facebook.com/AmigaOS (a more respectable 3,500 likes). What else, in 2011 I became a "benefactor" of Zach Weddington's Kickstarter film "Viva Amiga" pledging $150 toward making it happen - and what a fantastic job he did!


17. Who is Jack?
A. Haha, I assume you are referring to the software by that name I wrote for AmigaOS a few years ago? Jack was my first venture back into software programming for a significant amount of years, Jack was the very reason I stuck with AmigaOS (4) for so long.
For those who have never heard of Jack, in his current incarnation Jack is essentially an AppStore. However, without OS4Depot.net Jack would not even exist as he is tied inextricably with it. Everything that you can imagine that you can do with an AppStore Jack can do, besides downloading software, you can also comment and review titles and even send donations to developers through PayPal. Then there's Jill as well for AmigaOS, Jill sits on your Workbench showing as a discreet calendar in the top right of the screen - behind that calendar is a multitude of useful features waiting to be explored; both are available from OS4depot.net - have a look.



18. Any further comments to make?
A. In recent years I haven't really been able to dedicate much time into developing for AmigaOS. My most recent worked on project continues to receive little in the way of attention due to lack of user feedback. Evolve, is a development tool for AmigaOS that sets out to make graphical user interface development a doodle. It ties in nicely with MUI and the Hollywood language to make rapid software development a breeze. To find out more you can visit https://myevolve.wordpress.com/.  I really hope I can find not only time, but inspiration to get back into development.

Evolve Layout Panel

Evolve Menu Panel

Evolve Functions Panel

Friday, 9 June 2017

AmiKit X Installation

This is just a short step by step guide on how easy it is to install AmiKit X on a laptop.

When we first start AmiKit X we are presented with the welcome screen shown below, let's just press "Next" and see where it takes us.


We are now asked for the folder where we wish to save AmiKit, I will just keep it as the default folder and select "Next".

It seems we are now ready to install, so let's go right ahead.

So far everything is really straightforward with no messing, let's hope this continues, so let's press "Install" ad see what's next.


After just 2 minutes we get the chance to finish the installation process. So press finish and het presto, we are done. We now have our AmiKit shortcut on our desktop.


Double clicking the shortcut takes us to the launch window. Selecting "Launch" we are given our first glimpse on the Amiga Workbench displaying the AmigaOS install choices.

As I have a copy of Amiga Forever already installed so I'll just select "AF Installed" and take it from there and it proceeds to import system files, which takes a matter of seconds, then asks me to reboot.


Now I am taken to the very familiar Screenmode Prefs screen and I'll select a mode that is slightly lower than my laptops native resolution of 1366x768 so I'll select 1280x720.


Now apparently my AmiKit X installation is complete and I have to press "Enter" and get ready to be amazed.


Well I am amazed, after playing with it for a while I realise I am willing to go full screen with this so I just press F12 which opens up the WinUAE properties allowing me to select AmiKit-fullscreen.


And the process of having a fully functional AmigaOS laptop is complete.

In my next instalment I will be going to the next level.

Monday, 5 June 2017

Interview with Ján Zahurančík

1. Hello and welcome from us at BlitterWolf. For our readers could you tell us your name, country and occupation please?
A. First of all, thank you for the opportunity. My name is Ján Zahurančík from Slovakia. I am senior HR consultant and facilitator, and apparently an Amiga freak too :) I am the author of emulation distro called AmiKit available at http://www.amikit.amiga.sk.

Ján Zahurančík

2. When was your first experience with the Amiga and what were your thoughts?
A. As a Didaktik Gama user (our local clone of ZX Spectrum) I was shocked when I saw Amiga in action for the first time. I remember it was an Amiga 500 showing an Eric Schwartz’s animation in a loop in a shop window.


3. What Amiga systems do you currently own?
A. I don’t have any real machines anymore. I went virtual about 15 years ago :)


4. How many Amiga systems have you owned in your lifetime?
A. I had Amiga 500 with RAM expansion and then an Amiga 1200 with Blizzard 1240. I had an AmigaOne too.


5. Do you prefer using Classic or New Gen hardware?
A. Classic as I have grown up on it :)


6. What Amiga Operating System between 1.x and 4.x do/did you like to use most?
A. AmigaOS 3.9 is my favourite one, for the very same reason as before.


7. Have you ever been a member of an Amiga group and if so when and where?
A. Actually yes. It was around 1995, I was part of Slovak demo making group called Reform. My music modules are still somewhere on Aminet :)


8. Did you have your most favourite played games on Amiga and what were/are they?
A. I loved Lotus Turbo Challenge, Another World, Sensible Soccer, Cannon Fodder, Pinball Fantasies, Slamtilt, Syndicate, Mega lo Mania, Civilization, Dune 1 and 2, Elite, Frontier, Hired Guns and many, many more, of course.


9. Best Amiga system of all time for you?
A. Looking back I think Amiga 500 was the best. You simply turned it on, inserted a floppy disk and played the game almost instantly. Without any need to mess with OS. And you could turn the computer off anytime too :)


10. Best Amiga game of all time for you?
A. Every week different game!


11. What are your thoughts about what happened to Commodore - Amiga?
A. I was 14 years old at that time so I hardly noticed it ;)


12. How do you feel towards AmigaOS4 and reincarnations like AmigaOne?
A. I am happy that it’s still alive, in whatever reincarnation.


13. What do you make of the Amiga spin offs like MorphOS or AROS?
A. My previous answer applies ;)


14. What do you think about accelerators like the Vampire?
A. That’s something that makes me want the real Amiga machine again! :)


15. What do you see as the future for Amiga or Amiga like OS?
A. It will be in our hearts forever ;) It seems that the principle of light-weight operating systems is becoming important again.


16. Any further comments to make?
A. Support your favourite Amiga developers, there aren’t many left.

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Interview with Gigi Burdo

1. Hello and welcome from us at BlitterWolf. For our readers could you tell us your name, country and occupation please?
A. Hi, I'm Luigi Burdo, I'm from Italy and I'm in the Iformatic Technology staff for the  Data Governance of one Bank.

Luigi Burdo

2. When was your first experience with the Amiga and what were your thoughts?
A. My first Amiga I was seen was an Amiga 500,  I was 15y old (now I'm 42) and was in a shop of one friend of my father.

3. What Amiga systems do you currently own?
A. Now I have an X5000.

4. How many Amiga systems have you owned in your lifetime?
A. I had in my life all the Amiga classic systems from 500, 600, 1000, 1200, 2000, 3000D, 4000D with 060 and with powerups my best classic machine you can see here https://youtu.be/D3S5aM0ylPc about NG I had SAMs 440, 460, the AmigaOne XE G4 and Pegasos 2 1266.

5. Do you prefer using Classic or New Gen hardware?
A. Classic is nostalgic but not for every day ... NG is for do what is need today ;-)

6. What Amiga Operating System between 1.x and 4.x do/did you like to use most?
A. Really hard questions... but for sure I like more the AmigaOS 3.5 but just because was the new hope after the commodore close. a screenshot of my workbench in 1999 http://spazioinwind.libero.it/averdone/amigaita/users/wb/tlosm.jpg

7. Have you ever been a member of an Amiga group and if so when and where?
A. I was in the Agiba (Amiga Group Italy Bari) in the Bari city south of Italy.

8. Did you have your most favourite played games on Amiga and what were/are they?
A. There are many, for sure I can say one is the Turrican saga, Toki, and all the bitmap brothers games.

9. Best Amiga system of all time for you?
A. Amiga 4000

10. Best Amiga game of all time for you?
A. Chaos Engine CD32 and Gods ... is really hard to choose

11. What are your thoughts about what happened to Commodore - Amiga?
A. God wanna umans have slow technology progress, Amiga was years ahead.

12. How do you feel towards AmigaOS4 and reincarnations like AmigaOne?
A. Is the only way for have Amiga spirit in 2017 and use it in every day use.

13. What do you make of the Amiga spin offs like MorphOS or AROS?
A. MorphOS is really optimized PPC OS is fast and fun, AROS is a funny OS for the one who don't have opportunity to buy NG machine and have x86-64 hardware.

14. What do you think about accelerators like the Vampire?
A. Really cool, want one 500V2 for my 500+.

15. What do you see as the future for Amiga or Amiga like OS?
A. Really difficult to say, over the years all predictions are wrong results.

16. Any further comments to make?
A. Only one... Amiga Rulez 4ever

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Hollywood 7: Eternity Released

In the year of Hollywood's 15th anniversary, Airsoft Softwair, the hardest working men in code business, are back on your screen with Hollywood 7: Eternity. Hollywood 7.0 is a massive update with many new features and bug fixes. The most important new feature is full support for Unicode and native support for 64-bit CPUs on Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. This is especially useful on Linux because using 32-bit binaries on a 64-bit Linux is quite a hassle. On top of that, there are lots of other new features.

Here is a non-exhaustive list of new features in Hollywood 7.0:


  • Unicode is now fully supported!
  • Lots of new functions for dealing with Unicode text
  • Hollywood is now available in native 64-bit versions for Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and iOS
  • Mac OS and iOS backends have been completely rewritten, they are a lot faster now!
  • High resolution ("Retina") displays now fully supported on Windows, Mac OS, and iOS; Hollywood is ultra-crisp in 4K modes now
  • New hardware-accelerated full screen scale mode
  • Faster drawing on Windows and Mac OS
  • Lots of new features in the iOS backend
  • Support for conditional compiling at preprocessor level
  • Switch-Case statement supports fall through now
  • Text can now be laid out in justified lines
  • Lots of improvements in the IDE on Windows (e.g. direct help and syntax highlighting for functionality provided by plugins)
  • Multi-coloured vector paths are now supported
  • Live resizing on Windows and Mac OS
  • Time-stamped events
  • New example scripts
  • 70 new pages of PDF documentation, now 924 altogether!
  • Lots of other changes, optimizations and bug fixes

Hollywood 7.0 is the ultimate Multimedia experience and a must-have for all creative people. Hollywood is available on CD and as a download version. Both versions include Hollywood for all supported platforms (except the Android and iOS versions). It is no longer necessary to buy separate licenses for the different platforms. Buying Hollywood gives you a single-user license for all 15 platforms supported by Hollywood. If you already own Hollywood, you can buy a discounted upgrade version. People who bought Hollywood 6.1 in 2017 can request a free upgrade.

Hollywood is the ultimate bridge between all the different AmigaOS compatible platforms and the other three modern desktop systems, Windows, Mac OS, and Linux! Additionally, Hollywood also supports the Android and iOS platforms. A truly unique feature is the ability to cross-compile native executables for many different platforms including: AmigaOS3, AmigaOS4, WarpOS, MorphOS, AROS (x86), Windows (x86, x64), Mac OS X (x86, x64, PPC), and Linux (x86, x64, PPC, arm). You don't even have to own these platforms in order to compile executables for them. It's enough to run Hollywood on one of the supported platforms and then compile programs for all the others! Only Hollywood makes it possible. If you want to learn more about Hollywood, please visit the
official Hollywood portal which also has a forum for all questions concerning Hollywood.

All this makes Hollywood The Cross-Platform Multimedia Application Layer. Join the Multimedia revolution and get your personal copy of Hollywood 7: Eternity now!

This release was brought to you by Airsoft Softwair - the hardest working men in code business.

Saturday, 4 March 2017

A look into the Commodore Cave!

Hello everyone. :-)


Well it's about time I got a post out for myself. And for the one I'm publishing here I will be blogging about a particular computer museum I visited recently. But what's so special about this particular computer museum you may ask? Commodore computers of course! :-D


The Commodore Cave as it has been neatly named is a purpose built shed to house an electronic workshop and a Commodore computer collection. As well as other electronic items. Perhaps not a cave in the usual meaning of the word, but certainly one in the sense of being a mancave, as we call them now. The building is divided into an upstairs and downstairs section. With downstairs committed to the computer collection as well as a workshop. So I will concentrate on that. It is a private collection and not open to the public. My privilege to see it first hand courtesy of being in the same Amiga user group. ;-)


That's enough of the introduction so let's see what it contains. So I will move from left to right on our tour. I seem to like things in order. :-)

Here is a picture of the corner beside the door where you walk in. Is that the world's first fully 32-bit CD games console? Why yes I believe it is. An Amiga CD32!


Here's a view of the workshop. Lots of useful electronic instruments. That Amiga keyboard is looking good. While an Amiga motherboard is under diagnosis on the right.


Here's is a stack of rack mounts. Now that may not look very Commodore like but see that second one from the top? Not to deceive anyone but that hides an A1200 motherboard. Next to the blue light button is a mini CRT screen pulled from a camera. It's an Amiga test pattern generator.

Here's a collection of Commodore and Amiga software, books, boxes, peripherals, parts and even computers.

Enough of all that. Time to get to the collection. So here's the Commodore Corner as I will call it. First we have a wild card there, a Canon 1614P punched card calculator from 1969. Then starting the Commodore collection is a PET 2001-8 from 1977, displaying a demo. And beside a PET 4016 from 1981, showing the MC (machine code) monitor. I think I froze that one when I visited, me and my typing. ;-)



Following on we have a VIC-20. And next to it is a C64C, concluding the original Commodores currently in the collection. Bringing us to the Commodore-Amiga era and aptly so, the original Amiga A1000 with OCS. Including a PC sidecar expansion. And external floppy drive. Progressing to an A2000. Which is complimented by an A500 with side HD. Going up the ranks to an A3000 and the ECS era. Soon reaching the era of AGA. But not before the couch has eyes. ;-)

And here we are at the AGA generation. My favourite, the Amiga A1200. Now an A4000D is on the desk but OS4 is on screen? Aha, under the desk is an A4000T, pimped up with a PPC CPU card. Next to that is My First Amiga, the A600; almost too small to fit in a few pixels. I don't mean it was my first, which was an A500; but the A600 had the line "My First Amiga" printed on the box. One of the last Amigas Commodore produced. And speaking of being the first and the last, finally we have on display an AmigaOne machine in a standard tower case. Perhaps not a computer in the Commodore line nor an Amiga in the usual sense, but we'll let it share desk space with the other Commodores.




That concludes our tour of the Commodore Cave. As short as it might seem. I hoped you enjoyed the tour. And can look forward to future blogs of Commodore and Amiga computer content. See you next time. Damien :-)

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

InTune Recap

InTune Music Player


I started programming my InTune music player some time ago and was pleased with the way it was heading and with the introduction of MUIRoyale found I was able to incorporate a playlist.

Intune as it appeared on the 10th March 2013

I also struggled getting coverart to display but eventually overcame that issue as well and the software seemed to be coming along nicely.

For whatever reason, I can't remember why I just stopped working on it, today though I thought I'd get back to it, I recently set my Sam440ep up again after not using it for some time and thought this is the time to resume programming.

My problem was then where on earth are the files I need? Since stopping I have had a few new laptops, where I'd saved and possibly lost files.

Thankfully I've been able to find some of the artwork and I have an older version of my software but I'm hopeful that some files are saved on a MorphOS Powerbook I have hidden under the bed, unused for some time.

I'll be happy if within the next couple of days I can get to the position I was in on the 10th March 2013.

Everyone wish me luck at tracking down the files and getting back to the state it was over 4 years ago.